It seems easy to install laminate flooring for a single room, but even experts face problems when it comes to laying laminate flooring in a multi-room house. Questions arise about multiple-step installation, where to cut the flooring pieces, and how to ensure that they are the correct length.

plank installation on multi rooms size

The process of laying laminate flooring in multiple rooms is a bit more complicated because it is so much longer than traditional flooring. This means you might need someone else to help you with this project, or you will need a long enough measuring tape.

The following provides a step-by-step guide to laying laminate flooring in multiple rooms. This includes tips on cutting laminate flooring instead of buying the pieces pre-cut.

Choosing the right direction

The best direction usually depends on the house shape. A laminate floor can offer a unifying influence if its placement runs in the same direction throughout the house. Although there is no right direction, it is better to see the laminate flooring parallel to the longer walls especially considering the sight line from the entry, except for hallways. If you only have two rooms, install laminate flooring in the direction of the long wall. If you will have three or more rooms, consider installing laminate flooring in the direction of the shorter side of each room. 

Selecting the right length

To determine the correct length of laminate flooring for your multiple rooms, measure one room from the doorway to the far edge of that room. Measure another room in the same manner. Add at least two inches to each measurement to account for cutting and maneuvering around obstacles in each room like doors, windows, and hallways. For example, if one measurement was 32 feet and another was 30 feet, add at least two inches to both dimensions for a total length of 34 feet.

Planning transitions

Laying the laminates with transition & without transition has its difference. If you have more than one room to install laminate flooring, then a transition is a must. Transition features a small and subtle design element that transitions from one pattern to another. Without transition, the rooms would look like two completely different floors. Transition is something like a light border or a very thin line of random color in the laminate planks.

You may find a simple transition strip handy if you change the direction of the laminate flooring between rooms. If one room features laminate flooring of a different length or in a different direction than the adjacent room, then the two floors will not match up. The transition strips for laminate are made of thinner planks that are dark in color and feature a small, subtle design feature to bridge the difference between the lighter-colored laminate planks and the darker-colored laminate planks.

The easiest way to cut laminate flooring in multiple rooms is to get it pre-cut at the lumber store or home improvement center.

How to use transition strips?

The transitions strip for laminate flooring attaches to the metal tracks that you screw directly into the subfloor.  To accommodate the strips, a gap of 11/8 inches between either of two halves of the transition is needed, or the strip will not fit. 

This helps you install the tracks before you start laying the floor and ensure they are in the right places. Use them as references to measure the cuts later. You can use a T-molding if the planks on both sides of the transition are the same thickness or use a reducer strip to deal with different thicknesses. 

Laying the floor

When you decide the plank direction, you will basically consider the whole house as a single room despite the obstructions such as walls and doors. Simply start your installation in the corner of the house in accordance with the reference wall, and go from there until the edge of the flooring gets extended beyond the walls. Make sure to undercut the doorjambs using a hand saw for the flooring to fit underneath the door easily. If possible, removing the doors will make your job easier with fewer disruptions.

Conclusion

Installing laminate flooring in multiple rooms is a long and challenging job, but it is not that difficult to do correctly. The direction of the flooring, the length of the room, and using a transition feature will definitely help you do it right the first time. 

Commonly asked questions

1) Can I use transition strips to make the laminate flooring in one room match with the laminate flooring from a different room?  Yes, you can. The transition strip for laminate flooring attaches to the metal tracks that you screw directly into the subfloor. To accommodate the strips, a gap of 11/8 inches between either of two halves of the transition is needed, or the strip will not fit.

2) How do I figure out how long my linear feet need to be when cutting it? The easiest way to cut laminate flooring in multiple rooms is to get it pre-cut at your lumber store or home improvement center. Otherwise, measure first and then cut. 

3) What are some ways I can get more laminate floors in my house? You can have it installed in the basement or other cold spaces in your home. You could ask friends and family members who have laminate flooring in their homes to donate it to you as well.

4) Can I use edge banding instead of a transition strip when cutting laminate flooring? Yes, you could. The edge banding will match the pattern and the transition strips for laminate flooring will not fit between its two halves, so this will work fine.

5) Do both ends of the laminates have to be cut at the same time when installing the floors? The answer is no. You can cut the laminate flooring at one end first and then cut the other one later.

6) What if I buy a transition strip for laminate flooring and the strips did not fit? You can buy a reducer strip or have an extra gap of about 11/8 inches between either half of the transition. This will make it possible for you to get your strips to fit properly.

7) What is a reasonable thickness for transition strips in multi-room installations? A reasonable thickness for the transition strips is 1/2 inch.

8) Will laminate flooring install easier if I use corner cabinets? No, it will not. Corner cabinets are not designed to hold laminate flooring securely and installing it properly can be a challenge even for a professional installer. The laminate floors do not have enough strength to support the pressure of the cabinets when they are installed with them on them and the cabinets could end up falling over or sliding off easily.

9) How do I get away from using laminates without transitions? You can install a new piece of laminates near the transition strip. This will make it possible for you to use a more effective transition method instead.

10) Do I have to finish installing my laminate floors right away? No, it is recommended that you do not immediately go in and install your laminate floors. You should take a step back instead and figure out if there is something wrong with the floor first. If there is no problem with it, then you should let one dry before installing another one.

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